Nibunan Movie Review

First few minutes into the film, you can witness Arun Vaidyanathan ritually sticking to Hollywood’s storytelling. We’re introduced to the first murder that happens mysteriously and much psychotically followed by the arrival of protagonist Ranjith Kalidoss (Arjun). Just like James Bond and many other spy heroes, he is busy with an assignment and he just sets ‘300 seconds’ as deadline to bump them off. Never missing to notice the new earrings of his assistant Vandana (Varalaxmi Sarathkumar) and cracks a couple of witty lines with another chap on his aide Joseph (Prasanna) too.

Sooner, Naveen scores up a CSI series like signature theme for the title credits. Let stop it here or else this would run into an unauthorized screenplay.

Ranjith is on the verge of his current status as a topmost police officer, who just scores off brilliantly solving crime scenes. He is all set for his upgraded status as DSP and before that has a case to solve. Few prominent personalities in the society – Social activist, Lawyer and Doctor are mysteriously killed. But the serial killer leaves behind some perplexing clues, which finally reveals up the final victim – Ranjith himself. It’s not race against time for the protagonist and his aides, who have to trap the serial killer before things are too late. Adding more bizarre is the psychological turmoil that occurs with Ranjith diagnosed with Parkinson’s syndrome.

Be his debut directorial ‘Acchamundu Acchamundu’ or his production ‘Kalyana Samayal Saadham’, Arun never compromises with the script. His storytelling pattern too doesn’t shift anywhere outside and we are kept engrossed. Obviously, we’re offered a similar experience with Nibunan that decently travels on the line of its zone.

There are certain places where the drama has to be juggled between the detective investigations and family lives of cops. Over here in this aspect, Arun balances it up very well offering light moments with family, which embosses cute romance between husband-wife. Credits to Shruthi Hariharan for carrying her role with pleasant dignity! Their episodes are sweetly romantic that would appear as cynosure for multiplex and single screen audiences.

On the flip side, the murders being stereotypical often repeated (especially with the same signature music and slow motioned narration with each murder) gets us slightly bored. There is no flaw with the script, but such genre cannot be really engaging more than 90-100 minutes. In few places, we’re faintly reminded off Jeetu Joseph’s Memories too, but to just a certain extent. Moreover, the flashback sequences and the real cause behind murders might not be a real piece of show for the family audiences. It’s little outlandish for the family groups, though it might be debated as an encountered reality in many places.

Action King as the title ennobles, Arjun is simply voguish and he keeps you awestruck with an impeccable physique and stunts. The scenes, where he realizes his drawbacks and imagines soon-to-be culmination is emotionally done. Prasanna adds up humour in places along with Varalaxmi Sarathkumar, but are never seen powerful on brawny aspects.

Naveen has imparted his best with the background score and songs. The BGM is spellbinding, but in few places turns out to be a little miss with the visual coherence. But that doesn’t look like a flaw. Aravind Krishna brings up a unique tone and colour that actually a mystery-thriller deserves.

Clubbing together the analysis, Nibunan has a pretty compelling theme with engrossing narration, which if trimmed crisply would have been more gripping. Also, by the end of show, we slightly feel that it could have been a better show if the building of suspense elements were yet more appealing.

1 Reply to "Nibunan Movie Review"


    Got something to say?